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[–] Kuecofin 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

An interesting way to frame the problem of corruption in the state. Regardless of how many times you replace the people running the state it always devolves into the same pattern of corruption and abuse of power. The hierarchy imposed creates a natural power differential where some are more powerful than others simply because of the status of the position. If you somehow removed the hierarchy and gave everyone about equal power/influence in the system you could conceivably achieve a non-hierarchical society. Would need controls in place to prevent individuals from amassing more than a fair share of power (eg. everyone has a gun, wealth limits, etc), but then you've just created a hierarchy to control individuals. Maybe we need something non-human to act as a mediator?

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[–] properal [S] 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

The hierarchy imposed creates a natural power differential where some are more powerful than others simply because of the status of the position.

This is correct, in this model, the power need only come from the indication of rank and the willingness of the some critical mass of individuals to submit to agreed upon superiors. Individual humans do not have significant physical power differentials between them, It is the social organization that gives them different power. This model accounts for power coming from the hierarchy itself and not power differences between individuals.