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[–] Dfens 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago 

I've been 3D printing parts since 1994, and it has been revolutionary. I think people let their expectations run wild sometimes too, though. To me, this is a lot like anything plastic was in the 1970s. In those days engineers didn't know how to design for the new materials and often made anything plastic with similar cross sectional thickness to the metal parts they were used to designing. It was no surprise they would often fail.

There is a definite technique to making parts that work with a 3D printer. Tight tolerances are ok as long as they can be achieved with a post production material removal process. So if that hole needs to be 0.374 inches in diameter, make it 0.35 in your model, and drill and ream it when the part is cool and well set. If a surface has to slide, make the layers go the direction of the sliding contact, or sand the surface. It will work fine. There's plenty more, most gained with experience. And you only get experience by making parts.

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[–] bjhon 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago 

Really it is interesting! I'm thinking about making something for my daughter.

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[–] K_2 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago 

That was an awesome idea you just gave me thanks.

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[–] derram 1 points 0 points (+1|-1) ago 

https://www.hooktube.com/watch?v=f5fBwppxtkI :

What happened to the 3D printing revolution? - YouTube


This has been an automated message.

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[–] Morbo 3 points -2 points (+1|-3) ago 

People discovered that 3D printing isn't as good as traditional manufacturing techniques and stopped calling it a "revolution". Don't get me wrong, 3D printing is good for prototypes and one-off items that don't require precision, high strength or long term durability. If you need a precise item or one requiring high strength or other special properties, 3D printing is going to disappoint you. Also the number of materials you can print with is limited and the methods of printing have inherent flaws like layer separation or lack of smooth surfaces. You can't beat an injection molded part or machined piece of metal when you need something good. 3D printing is cheap but overall not at all ready for prime time.

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[–] Jimmycog 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago 

Only partially factual and Only with hobby equipment.

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[–] Morbo 2 points -2 points (+0|-2) ago 

Which puts the "revolution" back into manufacturers hands instead of cottage industries. I have a 3D printer and it has proven to me that fabricating a part via traditional methods with other tools is often the better route.