Profile overview for saprian.
Submission statistics

This user has mostly submitted to the following subverses (showing top 5):

41 submissions to amusing

16 submissions to whatever

14 submissions to Worldnews

14 submissions to news

7 submissions to videos

This user has so far shared a total of 133 links, started a total of 1 discussions and submitted a total of 80 comments.

Voting habits

Submissions: This user has upvoted 271 and downvoted 0 submissions.

Comments: This user has upvoted 175 and downvoted 0 comments.

Submission ratings

5 highest rated submissions:

5 lowest rated submissions:

Comment ratings

3 highest rated comments:

Twitter deletes an interesting tweet from Roseanne Barr submitted by dooob to whatever

saprian 3 points 27 points (+30|-3) ago

Interesting case (Marsh v. Alabama).

Wikipedia mentions the case was cited in Cyberpromotions vs AOL, arguing that AOL had opened them to the public to a degree sufficient that constitutional free speech protections could be applied. The federal district court disagreed, thereby paving the way for spam filters at the Internet service provider level. There may be better chances for political speech, but that might require showing in court that some ranking algorithm inside twitter or facebook penalizes only certain political opinions. That might be difficult to show even if true :-/

Google has confirmed that private emails sent and received by Gmail users can sometimes be read by third-party app developers submitted by nusto to news

saprian 1 points 15 points (+16|-1) ago

... when the user gives permission to the app to do so. Like... an email reader or an organizer app. Only WaPo journalists can be surprised by something like that. Sorry, for once not Googles fault.

Man who shot DEA agent during a surprise pre-dawn drug raid outside his home sentenced to 8 years in prison. No drugs were found in [...] house. submitted by saprian to news

saprian 0 points 13 points (+13|-0) ago

Robinson could have gotten 30 years to life if a jury had found him guilty. But in a deal, federal prosecutors agreed to drop most charges against Robinson, including manufacturing and distributing illegal drugs, if he would plead guilty to shooting Wilson. At Monday’s hearing, a prosecutor told the judge that evidence against Robinson now indicates he played “a limited role” in any drug scheme, just using his property to store illegal chemicals. No drugs were found in Robinson’s house.

So they charged him with drug crimes for non-existent drugs, then dropped the charges and charged him with assaulting a law enforcement officer with a deadly weapon? Would all charges have been dismissed had he not shot at the officer?

3 lowest rated comments:

JUST IN: TEXAS APPEALS COURT Decision On Voter ID Is A HUGE Victory For Voter Integrity ~ The claim that requiring an ID hurts minority voters was just reversed by an appeals court in Texas. submitted by Scrooblemeyer to politics

saprian 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago

I have some mixed feelings about this... It's not only going to hurt minority voters, but also all the people don’t have a photo ID because they don’t need it. There are people who don’t drive. Some people don’t have bank accounts and simply get their checks cashed by the dude who runs the local market down the street. People who live in small towns where everybody knows their name and they’ve never had a reason to get a photo ID. In Texas, for example, the cost of traveling to the nearest Department of Public Safety office, Texas’ version of the DMV, can be burdensome. I read that of the 254 counties in Texas, 78 do not have a permanent DPS office. In some communities along the Mexican border, the nearest DPS office is between 100 and 125 miles away.

JUST IN: TEXAS APPEALS COURT Decision On Voter ID Is A HUGE Victory For Voter Integrity ~ The claim that requiring an ID hurts minority voters was just reversed by an appeals court in Texas. submitted by Scrooblemeyer to politics

saprian 1 points -1 points (+0|-1) ago

Shouldn't the party with the most public support win? Integrity of the election is important, but counting the shift of election outcomes as a reason to support (or oppose) this measure seems pretty undemocratic and unamerican to me.

One Of LLVM's Top Contributors Quits Development Over CoC, Outreach Program submitted by saprian to whatever

saprian 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

The sign-off message he left: http://lists.llvm.org/pipermail/llvm-dev/2018-May/122922.html

The community change I cannot take is how the social injustice movement has permeated it. When I joined llvm no one asked or cared about my religion or political view. We all seemed committed to just writing a good compiler framework.

Somewhat recently a code of conduct was adopted. It says that the community tries to welcome people of all "political belief". Except those whose political belief mean that they don't agree with the code of conduct. Since agreement is required to take part in the conferences, I am no longer able to attend.