Profile overview for alieastrocyte.
Submission statistics

This user has mostly submitted to the following subverses (showing top 5):

28 submissions to science

22 submissions to Neuroscience

8 submissions to videos

1 submissions to psychology

This user has so far shared a total of 59 links, started a total of 0 discussions and submitted a total of 12 comments.

Voting habits

Submissions: This user has upvoted 5 and downvoted 0 submissions.

Comments: This user has upvoted 6 and downvoted 0 comments.

Submission ratings

5 highest rated submissions:

5 lowest rated submissions:

Seeing Without The Force: How Chirrut Imwe from Rogue One Can See, submitted: 12/11/2016 11:26:58 PM, -4 points (+2|-6)

Seeing Without The Force: How Chirrut Imwe from Rogue One Can See, submitted: 12/11/2016 11:27:33 PM, -2 points (+1|-3)

Oh SH**, it's time to learn about Tourette Syndrome, submitted: 11/13/2016 5:28:19 PM, -1 points (+2|-3)

Before you choo choo CHOOSE someone, explore the science of love , submitted: 2/7/2016 10:13:36 PM, 0 points (+3|-3)

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?, submitted: 2/21/2016 7:02:54 PM, 0 points (+1|-1)

Comment ratings

3 highest rated comments:

The most scent-ual of our five senses :D submitted by alieastrocyte to science

alieastrocyte 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago

I get what you mean. We're not going as in-depth as possible for the sake of simplicity and video length. On the bright side, this is just our "basic" neuroscience series right now. We will likely do some more elaborate videos later on that dive deep into these basic concepts. Thanks for the comment!

Food sustains us. But what happens when it becomes the enemy? submitted by alieastrocyte to videos

alieastrocyte 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago

Hey hey! Sorry for getting to this late. Apparently I am not getting notifications. In any case, we are the producer/author of the series! Please feel free to share feedback! We are always interested.

Food sustains us. But what happens when it becomes the enemy? submitted by alieastrocyte to videos

alieastrocyte 0 points 1 points (+1|-0) ago

I think you have some really good points here. It's kind of funny because it verbalizes a lot of the things we've been discussing between ourselves about the channel as well. That's all to say that we're hoping to change and grow our style over time. One of the first things will involve going "on-site" or, at the very least, changing up the scenery. We've also been talking about a more comfortable presentation style and getting conversational - this would involve these "dynamics", as you called them. Additionally, we've started looking more at the "point" of the video rather than the objective content. We want to answer the question, "why should you care?" This will take time to develop, but it's something we always have in the back of our minds.

So thank you for your thought-out criticism. It is somewhat validating to know that our vision is what others want as well. We want our videos to succeed as well, not to pat ourselves on the back, but to popularize and demystify neuroscience. Thanks for watching and hopefully you notice a change in our future videos!

3 lowest rated comments:

The most scent-ual of our five senses :D submitted by alieastrocyte to science

alieastrocyte 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Neglected and relegated to the back of the stage? :P

San Diego Comic Con - where science fiction and science fact collide! submitted by alieastrocyte to science

alieastrocyte 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

We've lived in San Diego for the last three years and have gotten tickets all three years. That said, it is true that tickets are difficult to get, but I don't think that there is any particular bias against San Diegans. When you have one of the most popular cons in the world, it makes sense that not everyone will get to attend. Sorry you weren't able to go! That sucks!

What does the activated microglia say to the neuron? "You inflame me!" Learn more about the brain's housekeepers and security guards. submitted by alieastrocyte to Neuroscience

alieastrocyte 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Hey there! Microtubules are a structural element of a lot of our brain. They are the building blocks that help neurons grow so long and thin. You are correct that microtubules are vital to axonal transport. They help the message shoot down the long, thin cell. However, they are a part of the neuron - a larger, more complex structure. It would be like attributing all communication on the Internet to wires. It is not totally inaccurate because they play a big role, but computers are what send and receive the information. Computers are like the neurons because they are the communicators.

The theory of Orch-OR is a controversial one. It scales down communication to the microtubule level, which is interesting to think about. However, many other scientists have conducted studies that show this theory does not hold up. Some of the main tenets have been rebuffed. This does not necessarily mean it is incorrect - the brain is a complex organism and there is still a lot to understand. However, there is a lot of evidence for inter-neuronal communication as the primary means of passing information.

Thanks for watching! I hope you enjoyed it despite what you thought was inaccurate information at the start of the video. :)