Profile overview for NeverThrowawayFood.
Submission statistics

This user has mostly submitted to the following subverses (showing top 5):

1 submissions to Frugal

1 submissions to greenanarchism

1 submissions to Sewing

This user has so far shared a total of 2 links, started a total of 1 discussions and submitted a total of 39 comments.

Voting habits

Submissions: This user has upvoted 25 and downvoted 0 submissions.

Comments: This user has upvoted 41 and downvoted 0 comments.

Submission ratings

5 highest rated submissions:

Threading a needle by rubbing it on the thread actually worked for me., submitted: 8/31/2018 2:15:45 AM, 7 points (+7|-0)

Saved my bag's zipper this morning with the help of this video., submitted: 3/6/2018 11:05:07 AM, 5 points (+5|-0)

Shou Sugi Ban: How to Preserve Wood Using Fire - The Permaculture Research Institute, submitted: 10/7/2018 2:58:55 PM, 2 points (+2|-0)

5 lowest rated submissions:

Shou Sugi Ban: How to Preserve Wood Using Fire - The Permaculture Research Institute, submitted: 10/7/2018 2:58:55 PM, 2 points (+2|-0)

Saved my bag's zipper this morning with the help of this video., submitted: 3/6/2018 11:05:07 AM, 5 points (+5|-0)

Threading a needle by rubbing it on the thread actually worked for me., submitted: 8/31/2018 2:15:45 AM, 7 points (+7|-0)

Comment ratings

3 highest rated comments:

The problem is not that you don't make enough money. Problem is that things COST too much. submitted by eqi397 to whatever

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago

Food's less expensive than most people seem to think, if you know how to cook rudimentarily and to shop for it. But it's true it's bid up to absurd prices because people are very thoughtless and unfrugal. Phone and internet plans are the same way.

Proper composting submitted by SurfinMindWaves to JustGrowIt

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 3 points (+3|-0) ago

They are anti-fungal. Citrus peel/oil is useful for food, cleansers, and pest repellent, so there is no need to trash it until we have extracted that goodness.

Meat and oils are okay for anaerobic composting, and when it is locked away from animals, but you don't want to turn your pile anaerobic accidentally. It slows everything down by like an order of magnitude.

What is your favorite egg recepy? submitted by The_Red_Kraken to AskVoat

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago

My favorite egg is fried, but next best is broccoli quiche. It's so simple that even just frozen broccoli under eggs in the microwave works. Add in as much cheese as you can stand.

3 lowest rated comments:

How to Make Homemade Brownies With Cocoa Powder submitted by Le_Squish to Recipes

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

For the sake of the sub's rules, here is the recipe text copied directly from the site

Ingredients:

⅔ cup vegetable oil
⅔ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
½ cup all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
⅔ cup packed brown sugar
1⅓ cups confectioners sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Directions:

Heat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a 9-inch square baking pan with parchment paper.
In a small bowl, stir together the oil and cocoa powder. Set aside for 4 to 5 minutes. 
While the cocoa sits, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt in a small bowl.
In a large bowl, beat together the eggs, powdered sugar and brown sugar using a mixer or a heavy spatula for 2 to 3 minutes. The mixture should be lighter in color and slightly fluffy. Stir in the vanilla.
Add 1/2 of the cocoa and oil mixture to the egg mixture. Mix on medium speed, or with a vigorous hand, until it's shiny -- about 5 minutes. 
Gently blend in the flour; use a lower speed if utilizing a hand mixer. When the mix is combined – about 1 minute – add the rest of the cocoa. Thoroughly blend for another minute or so.
Pour the batter into the prepared baking pan. 
Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, depending on how you like your brownies. Longer cook times yield a firmer brownie. Cool completely.

I'm not sure about the recommendation for brown sugar or confectioner's sugar. Both that I can acquire today taste funny. Confectioner's sugar especially tastes like mostly strongly flavored corn starch now, but I could see this recipe working in the past. I suggest carefully considering your sugars, and using anything else (white sugar, honey, cane syrup, even Karo or some cheap cane-flavored corn syrup) to eliminate off flavors from these flavored and adulterated sugar products.

Also, be liberal with the vanilla. One or two capfuls is the minimum usually recommended for that much cocoa and sugar.

Go to Google Maps... Find the Rich Estates Near You. KNOW WHERE THEY ARE. Find Where Your Politicians Live. Let Them Know You're Coming for Them When the SHTF. submitted by 8_billion_eaters to Survival

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Too easy. What you accomplish this way is to warn a resourceful enemy that they are targeted. Alternate theory: publish these grand estates in a survival pamphlet at the rec center and the local employment offices. Don't make a big deal out of them, but include their addresses somehow. Turn the golden horde that way, away from you and I!

What's your favorite kind of herbal tea? submitted by DieselBustersYes to Tea

NeverThrowawayFood 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Hibiscus tea, or agua de jamaica in Spanish. It produces a dark, rich brew, high in vitamin C. It can take heavy sweetening, and that's traditional, but it doesn't always require it. Unsweetened hibiscus tea goes well with a little grape or cranberry juice for accent, which tend to be over-sweetened anyway.