Profile overview for LDV.
Submission statistics

This user has mostly submitted to the following subverses (showing top 5):

1 submissions to whatever

This user has so far shared a total of 0 links, started a total of 1 discussions and submitted a total of 5 comments.

Voting habits

Submissions: This user has upvoted 6 and downvoted 0 submissions.

Comments: This user has upvoted 5 and downvoted 0 comments.

Submission ratings

5 highest rated submissions:

Just got reverse-privileged, submitted: 9/23/2015 11:52:34 AM, 84 points (+87|-3)

5 lowest rated submissions:

Just got reverse-privileged, submitted: 9/23/2015 11:52:34 AM, 84 points (+87|-3)

Comment ratings

3 highest rated comments:

Hi UK, I'm new to voat and was a large contributer to this sub in reddit and /r/Buckinghamshire. I think we need to pick it up here... submitted by Calza to UnitedKingdom

LDV 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago

Didn't we find a few weeks ago barely anyone in /r/uk was visiting their local subs?

Someone could create a UK set though at any rate.

What's your best way to study and why? submitted by Sire to AskVoat

LDV 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago

I think it really depends what you're studying. I studied accounting and business finance which actually had a lot of contextual papers and journals I had to read, so I would sit down, skim over the paper first to get the gist or the main points, then read it a second time slightly more deliberately to fill in a google docs template to look like this; (example is from my notes)

The contingent design of performance measurement
Robert Chenhall (2006)

Summary
Chenhall looks at performance measurement evolutions and how they are useful in organisations. He finds that enhanced performance from new performance measures depends on the organisational context.

Introduction
Performance measurement is at the heart of control. Traditionally these have been monetary measures. Many management accountants have called for more specific measures that incorporate non-financial information. Chenhall sets out to suggest that enhanced performance outcomes from using non-financial information depends on the organisational context.

Interesting points
Contingency approaches see organisations change their approaches over time to fit new contingencies.

Contextual variables: external environment; strategy; technology; organisational structure; size.

There have been many innovations in performance measurement.

Non financial measures, integrated measures, contingencies affecting integrated measures.

Conclusion
i. It is unlikely that these innovations will be useful in all organisations - it was found that positive benefits are not universalistic.
ii. Performance measures should be considered in the broader patterns of organisational context
iii. Suggested that innovative perfomance measures are ‘fads and fashions’ rather than having genuine improvements across the board - firms just want to appear like they are using the most contemporary measures

Then I could move onto the next paper, it would take me about two hours to do each one, and I'd put some time apart at the end of the week to skim over previous weeks works to tie them together and allow my brain to make connections between different pieces of work. In this way I was very task focused, being able to do a 'job' of study then move onto the next paper to study, rather than thinking of it in half hour blocks. It worked for me :).

edit: for music I mostly had no music, sometimes I listened to quiet dance music just for background filler. again I think that's a personal thing

What's your best way to study and why? submitted by Sire to AskVoat

LDV 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

I don't know if it's exactly speedreading, I developed it organically. So essentially I started with the article, read the abstract, then skimmed the introduction, quickly flicked through the article to see if there were any cool graphs or info boxes, then read the conclusion, not trying to take it all in but more just to prime my brain for what kind of thing the paper was talking about.

Then I would sit down and go through still quickly, not at a regular reading pace (but a little bit more deliberately as I said, engaging the brain and 'actively reading') to try to take out the important things. I find that writing it out in your own words as well is a huge part of committing the knowledge to memory. I did look at something online for how to speed read by rather than looking at each individual word on a line of text (which takes time for your eyes to move from word to word), instead pick three focal points along the line of text and let a bit of your peripheral vision extract the words.

3 lowest rated comments:

Hello Voat submitted by asaggese to introductions

LDV 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Hi Alessandro

What's your best way to study and why? submitted by Sire to AskVoat

LDV 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

I don't know if it's exactly speedreading, I developed it organically. So essentially I started with the article, read the abstract, then skimmed the introduction, quickly flicked through the article to see if there were any cool graphs or info boxes, then read the conclusion, not trying to take it all in but more just to prime my brain for what kind of thing the paper was talking about.

Then I would sit down and go through still quickly, not at a regular reading pace (but a little bit more deliberately as I said, engaging the brain and 'actively reading') to try to take out the important things. I find that writing it out in your own words as well is a huge part of committing the knowledge to memory. I did look at something online for how to speed read by rather than looking at each individual word on a line of text (which takes time for your eyes to move from word to word), instead pick three focal points along the line of text and let a bit of your peripheral vision extract the words.

Why did you pick your username? submitted by Snorlax to AskVoat

LDV 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

Hello o/