Profile overview for CharlemaneLeeroy.
Submission statistics

This user has mostly submitted to the following subverses (showing top 5):

1 submissions to introductions

1 submissions to news

1 submissions to WhatShouldIWatch

This user has so far shared a total of 1 links, started a total of 2 discussions and submitted a total of 21 comments.

Voting habits

Submissions: This user has upvoted 9 and downvoted 0 submissions.

Comments: This user has upvoted 16 and downvoted 0 comments.

Submission ratings

5 highest rated submissions:

Effective immediately all your voats are belong to us., submitted: 7/10/2015 4:11:16 PM, 10 points (+10|-0)

The Euro: Great for Germany, shit for Greece - Vox, submitted: 7/10/2015 3:40:49 AM, 6 points (+6|-0)

Let's get this party started!, submitted: 7/10/2015 3:54:38 PM, 5 points (+5|-0)

5 lowest rated submissions:

Let's get this party started!, submitted: 7/10/2015 3:54:38 PM, 5 points (+5|-0)

The Euro: Great for Germany, shit for Greece - Vox, submitted: 7/10/2015 3:40:49 AM, 6 points (+6|-0)

Effective immediately all your voats are belong to us., submitted: 7/10/2015 4:11:16 PM, 10 points (+10|-0)

Comment ratings

3 highest rated comments:

FBI Director claims it thwarted Islamic State-inspired July 4 attacks; doesn't reveal number of plots or their targets. submitted by sarcastasaur to news

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 4 points (+4|-0) ago

The threat level has been raised to orange, which once again, means nothing.

Bees Are Losing Their Habitat Because of Climate Change submitted by millsdmb to news

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago

Wasn't the study about bumble bees only? I know they're exceptionally fuzzy but surely there are other species of bees that perform pollination, let alone other insects and birds. I think this write up was a little alarmist. From what I heard on NPR, the issue is more that some species of bumblebees, rather than all, are dying out at lower latitudes. While this bodes for less genetic diversity, it's not necessarily indicative of a total loss of pollinators or even bees.

Lost city 'could rewrite history' submitted by flock-o-turtles to ForbiddenArcheology

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 2 points (+2|-0) ago

So this is something I've always wondered about. If we know that most human settlements are near coasts, rivers, or lakes, could the rising sea levels hide more cities like this? There are quite a few thousand years between the evolution of accepted modern humans and the first cities in Mesopotamia, how many more places like this one could be out there?

3 lowest rated comments:

White House Ends Its Interference in Approval of Genetically Modified Salmon submitted by catechumen to UnderReported

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

This was a good article. I wonder if there are vaccines being held up because of pandering to idiots.

How for-profit prisons have become the biggest lobby no one is talking about submitted by matt to UnderReported

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

These companies are a major force behind tough on crime politicians. It's no coincidence that mandatory sentencing guidelines got really popular right around the time that private prisons took off.

Lost city 'could rewrite history' submitted by flock-o-turtles to ForbiddenArcheology

CharlemaneLeeroy 0 points 0 points (+0|-0) ago

How would they effectively establish relationships between artifacts and the settlement in strong currents with the tectonic activity as well? Couldn't the sinking be the result of fault activity too?